Characters, Writing

Writers Weekend: Back to Schoolish

Writers Weekend Banner

Welcome to Writers Weekend, your virtual getaway dedicated to all things writing! Join a community of writers as we share our struggles, triumphs, and most of all, our love of the craft. Once a month I’ll post a prompt, whether it’s a list of questions or an open ended inquiry or just a random writing exercise. Write your post, add your link in a comment, and then check out and comment on a few of the other links! You can grab the blog button below (or the banner above!), but please link back.

Continue reading “Writers Weekend: Back to Schoolish”

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Writing

You’re Saying More Than You Think You Are

This is not about body language.

It has nothing to do with tone of voice or eye contact or facial expressions.

This is about the unconscious linguistic associations that people will make while reading your writing, and why ignoring things like etymology and prosody makes you a really bad writer.

Continue reading “You’re Saying More Than You Think You Are”

Characters, Writing

Writers Weekend: Swipe Right

Writers Weekend Banner

Welcome to Writers Weekend, your virtual getaway dedicated to all things writing! Join a community of writers as we share our struggles, triumphs, and most of all, our love of the craft. Every other week I’ll post a prompt, whether it’s a list of questions or an open ended inquiry or just a random writing exercise. Write your post, add your link in a comment, and then check out and comment on a few of the other links! You can grab the blog button below (or the banner above!), but please link back.
Continue reading “Writers Weekend: Swipe Right”

The Well, Writing

Worldbuilding: The Devil’s in the Details

WORLDBUILDING.png

How do you incorporate details into a story? Like if it’s a fantasy, how do you balance world-building with plot and character development? If it’s set in a historical period, how do you make sure the details are accurate, necessary?

-curious writer

The most important element of worldbuilding is the knowledge that people will approach your world with only the understanding of their own world. If they’re an avid reader, they might have a broader vocabulary concerning worldbuilding, but you can’t rely on something a reader might or might not know. So as you introduce details of a foreign world, be it fantasy, sci-fi, historical fiction, alternate realities, what have you, always keep in the back of your mind how it relates to the here and now—the world to which your reader will unconsciously compare your world. Continue reading “Worldbuilding: The Devil’s in the Details”

Writing

gtfo tumblr: On Accidentally Racist Villains

Tumblr is a cesspit of bad advice and poorly constructed arguments, but thing that really gets my goat is the plethora of bad writing advice on there and, consequently, floating around on Pinterest. Why does this bother me so much, you ask? Well, for one, because I have a hard time passing up correcting people I know are blatantly wrong. But the real reason is this: in the era of self-publishing, there’s a plethora of really, really bad fiction. Like, really bad. Seriously. And do you know where most of it comes from? Dear little tumblr users taking this terrible advice because they know no better. So, in the name of bettering the fiction of the future (and a little for my own gratification), I am starting a column in which I correct some of the terrible advice I see on tumblr. Enjoy. Continue reading “gtfo tumblr: On Accidentally Racist Villains”